Harry Lang
6 min readMar 30, 2024

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Society Should Embrace The Concept Of Burning Bridges — Especially If Andrew Tate Is Involved

Blocking destructive behaviours caused by social media is essential if we want to protect young people from getting hurt

Harry Lang, originally published in The Drum, April 2024

‘Never burn your bridges’ — that was the advice I regularly received in my early agency career. It seemed like good counsel at the time, too, but it had an expiry date. I now know that if you’re gonna burn a bridge, then River Kwai that bad boy — just to be absolutely certain there’s no going back.

Back then, I only burnt one bridge. It was with a difficult client, and I’d emailed him on my final day at the agency pointing out his (many and varied) flaws. I spoke of burning bridges and how, if I ever had the misfortune to work with him again, my career was already over, and I’d have to find a welcoming monastery to hide in for the rest of my days instead.

He never replied (probably couldn’t work out how to send an email) but that didn’t matter. I felt no better — in fact, I felt a little sordid. I’d been paid to do a job, which included managing tough clients, and by sending that one single email I’d fallen at the last fence. I wandered home that night feeling hollow, and very much like I’d let myself — and the agency — down.

It took me many years to realise that bridge burning could actually be appropriate — even essential — if due thought, consideration and, crucially, time is committed to the decision.

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Harry Lang

I'm a UK based CMO and author of 'Brands, Bandwagons & Bullshit' - a guidebook for young people about how marketing, advertising, media and PR work.